Testing Results

I’m very happy with the test results. Tweaking these recipes in my cone 8 kiln so that I can get as close to possible before taking up precious room in the big gas fired cone 10 reduction kiln. All of these recipes are based on the Leach 40 – 30 – 20 – 10 recipe method which so far seems very stable. Getting the specific gravity dialed in is important.

Testing rolls right along

So I’ve got all the chemicals I need to make a vast amount of glazes in my simple palate and color range. Testing to cone 8 in my electric kiln so I can tweak it as close as I can before putting it into the big gas fired kiln at cone 10.

  • Zircopax white over temmoku
  • White over Celadon
  • Temmoku over Celedon with a dip into the red iron oxide (FE2O3) as a differentiator test
  • Clear glaze by itself
  • Zircopax white by itself.

Im really excited about these simple glaze combinations. Along with red wild clay slip from the lake and black slip that goes to cone 10 I have a wide range of decorating possibilities to play with.

Previous Celadon glaze tests with incrementing FE2O3 from 2% to 12%


Testing the specific gravity of the glaze with hydrometer.


The only thing I may want to do different is to get more flux into the white glaze to have it run, almost like a Nuka style glaze over Temmoku.

John Britt’s Complete guide to High Fire Glazes has enough information to keep me busy for many years! Big thanks to Jay Benzel of Benzel Pottery for loaning it out to me.

Another thing I was working on was pulling technique and made a nice delicate serving spoon. Beautiful right?!

Not anymore! Haha! The spoon is just a spoon. ¬†That’ll learn me to put stuff on the counter!

On Establishing a Rhythm

Art takes rhythm. Ceramics is no exception and probably needs it moreso than the majority of other art forms. It is especially slow paced and the process from beginning to end to create a piece can be weeks to months depending on firing schedules. Not to mention that it can take years before you truly master your materials. Testing glazes alone will take me many months to complete.

The rhythm with ceramics tends to go at “life pace”. Most of us hold down full time jobs, have families and other obligations to attend to before working on our own projects. It seems that it falls into a slow seasonal rhythm spanning years and this is something that I do not mind.

Winter is spent mostly indoors for me so I tend to work on pinched vessels and things that I can do away from the wheel. Spring is a time for re-invigoration, cleaning the mental ¬†clutter and getting back on the wheel. Summer is hot and with that comes the long days and trying to tighten up with routines. Fall is a magical time where I feel the most creative and bold. We’ll see how it goes over the years and how it gets more integrated with life until the goal of life being pottery and pottery being life comes about.

Here is a nice video on Establishing Rhythm with Dionne Swift. While not specifically a pottery video the core concepts span across mediums.

Establishing a Rhythm from R&A Collaborations on Vimeo.